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10/02/2014
By: John H.
Pusey Jr, Frank O, MD
Have had great experiences with Dr. Pusey. His diagnosis was spot on, since confirmed at both Emory and Duke. He is personable and a good listener. The ACA made my group insurance plan illegal, so unfortunately had to switch to someone accepted in my new network - for this I blame Obama. I would highly recommend Dr. Pusey to anyone - he is the hardest working neurologist in Columbia, taking ER duties as well as follow up appointments. He really gave a lot of thought to my diagnosis, and was completely correct. The Duke neurologists also lauded him for his initial treatment plan, with which I improved greatly. They followed the same plan (initially) for my care as in their hospital as well. He first handled my case in the ER and followed up with me after. I am grateful for his care.
07/06/2015
By: Lorraine T.
Pusey Jr, Frank O, MD
After having MRI of the brain and results abnormal we were referred to Dr. Pusey to make sure it was safe to travel to Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. After spending a lot of time and money at Mayo my husband and I decided to return home and continue with Dr. Pusey we felt we could trust him and he was looking out for what was best for me.
01/22/2013
By: dene.dupre
Katherine E Gordon MD
She listens, she takes whatever time is needed to address my problems. Very easy to communicate with her.
03/08/2013
By: savvykathy
Lexington Endocrinology
Wonderful -My Advocate...Need I say More!!!
Tips & Advices
A child should see his or her pediatrician frequently during the first few years. Once the child reaches age 3, parents should schedule a doctor's visit at least once per year. Before that, however, the American Academy of Pediatrics suggests parents arrange visits according to the following schedule:
  • 2 to 5 days old
  • 1 month old
  • 4 months old
  • 6 months old
  • 9 months old
  • 12 months old
  • 15 months old
  • 24 months old (2 years)
  • 30 months old (2.5 years)
No, parents should call 911, an emergency physician, or a pediatric emergency physician if a child suffers an acute illness or injuries. Doctors in these fields are more qualified than pediatricians to handle emergency situations.
A well-visit is a routine visit with a pediatrician to track a child's development, discuss medical or emotional concerns, and receive immunizations and medical advice.
Yes, pediatricians provide immunizations for infants and children up through 21 years.
No, pediatricians do not have to be board certified.They're only required to have a state license. However, certification indicates a dedication to studying pediatrics beyond the requirements.

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