Affordable Animal Hospital in Torrance, CA with Reviews - YP.com
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08/26/2017
By: Daniel C.
Ohana Veterinary Clinic
Took our dog here to get spayed. They killed her and say that she died "unknown reasons". Completely furious at their professionalism and their way of handling the situation. They call the crematory and send her to get cremated. Don't even bother to do additional bloodwork or anything to see what the cause of death was. I would never recommend this place to have their pet spayed, or any type of surgery. They apparently have no idea what they are doing. If you have pets that you love and care about, DO NOT bring them here.
03/11/2017
By: Pete D.
Edward B Leeds DVM
if you want to waste 35-40 minutes sitting in an empty waiting room on your first visit, this is the guy for you. HORRIBLE first impression. Glad I left and didn't leave my dog with him. Maybe this old arrogant fool should retire. Took my dog to a competent surgeon...you should too.
08/18/2016
By: fashionista_designer
Crenshaw Animal Hospital & Cat Clinic
Dr woods, was gentile with my dogs, both dogs are never afraid to visit her office. Everyone in the office are always super sweet and attentive. The place is clean and parking is easy!I am very grateful to have found her!
10/08/2015
By: Stacy C.
Skypark Animal Hospital
HORRIBLE HORRIBLE HOSPITAL. PLEASE DO NOT TAKE YOUR ANIMALS HERE. (1) This doctor does not care about animals in the slightest, he just wants to take your money. (2) This doctor regularly operates while administering anesthesia, which is ILLEGAL. God knows if he is even licensed to administer anesthesia. (3) This doctor will suggest all sorts of unnecessary procedures to increase your medical bills. (4) This doctor has 1 goal and that is to make money. He is not afraid of being sued for malpractice because of his insurance. He claims insurance will cover all his wrong doings. (5) This doctor is inhumane and totally insensitive, even when his own negligence causes the death of a pet. (6) This doctor is hardly a doctor. he is 100% a fraud. He has ZERO employees, he runs an entire hospital alone. Lord knows what goes on behind closed doors. How does one person control and treat a dog at the same time? Easy answer: LOADS OF ANESTHESIA. STAY FAR FAR AWAY FROM SKYPARK!!!!!!!!!!!
Tips & Advices
Most 24-hour clinics do not allow owners to stay with their pets overnight. However, many do have specific visiting hours or will let owners see their pets at any point during the day. In addition, owners can call most clinics at any time for an update on their pet's well being.
  • Important phone numbers, especially those of the the veterinary clinic, the animal hospital or emergency clinic, and the poison control center
  • A book detailing pet first-aid steps
  • Copy of medical records
  • Nylon leash
  • Muzzle (only use if pet is not vomiting and has no difficulty breathing)
  • Absorbent gauze
  • Nonlatex disposable gloves
  • Scissors
  • Tweezers
  • Nail clippers
  • Digital thermometer
  • Sterile saline solution
  • Hydrogen peroxide (to induce vomiting only at the recommendation of a veterinarian
  • Milk of magnesia (to absorb poison only at the recommendation of a veterinarian)
Find a 24-hour animal hospital that provides emergency services within your area. Keep the facility's contact information in a place that's easy to locate, such as the refrigerator, address book, or smartphone. Most veterinary clinics operate on standard business hours and are not equipped to handle emergencies.
Veterinary clinics operate on a smaller scale than animal hospitals. The latter are more likely open 24 hours and provide emergency services. The former generally operate on typical office hours and only perform wellness exams and minor surgeries. Veterinary clinics also do not generally perform laboratory tests on site.
The specifics vary depending on the type of visit. For a wellness exam, bring:
  • Medical records
  • The type or brand of food the pet eats
  • Medication (including flea, tick, and heartworm medication).
If the animal needs medical treatment, the following may be helpful depending on the situation:
  • Fresh stool sample
  • Vomit sample
  • Video of the pet engaging in abnormal behavior
  • Substance the pet may have ingested

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