Best 10 Animal Shelters in Springfield, MO with Reviews - YP.com
Book appointments, post photos, and write reviews.Open in YP App

Temporary Error.

Please try reloading the page.

02/07/2017
By: xxxunknownxxx
Humane Society of Southwest Missouri
They will kill the shy puppies. So my suggestion to you is, if your looking to adopt, go for the shy dogs because they will be the next one on the list to put down on Wednesday. Or, if you are bringing in a dog, and its shy, I encourage you to reconsider.
06/19/2016
By: David E.
Humane Society of Southwest Missouri
What you should be fed up with is the people who drop their animals off in the middle of the night in someone else's neighborhood if your that pissed maybe you should rescue them!!!!!
01/23/2015
By: terry.weldon.14
Humane Society of Southwest Missouri
They disgust me! They kill your pet even if it is eligible for adoption. The dog has 5 seconds after arrival to determine his fate. They get no chance.
09/24/2014
By: paulmduckworth
Humane Society of Southwest Missouri
I visited the Human Society for the first time in over twenty years recently. I am very impressed with the staff and the operation. I'm surprised at the negative reviews here and can only speculate that some of them may have an axe to grind. Being an organization of mostly volunteers, the finesse and people skills of some volunteers may not be always the best. I believe in the mission of this organization. It is not there to please everyone with an animal issue, it is there to do a good job of saving pets with a high potential of getting adopted into loving home. I know that the shelter does euthanize some animals. They do not promote themselves as a "no-kill" shelter. They are a great organization that connects people and adoptable animals together. They are humane. The real problem is not animal shelters that euthanize, it is people who abandon or dump pets and/or fail to get their pets neutered or spayed. Human beings can be at their best or their worst when it comes to dealing with dogs and cats.
10/10/2013
By: n0stars
Humane Society of Southwest Missouri
I'd give this place ZERO stars if I could
10/10/2013
By: n0t_rec0mmeded
Humane Society of Southwest Missouri
Humane Society makes me sick! Everything from their business practices, to how they treat their animals, to how they lie in the media. Just very upsetting!
10/10/2013
By: d1sgust3d
Humane Society of Southwest Missouri
I am DISGUSTED with the Humane Society's practices...
10/10/2013
By: hat3_th3m
Humane Society of Southwest Missouri
I don't like the way they do business
10/10/2013
By: th3y_suck
Humane Society of Southwest Missouri
I DON'T LIKE THE WAY THEY TREAT THEIR ANIMALS!
10/10/2013
By: r.albright.
Humane Society of Southwest Missouri
They don't even know the age of the dogs they have in their kennels! I adopted a beagle that had a sign on the cage stating she was 5 years old. When I picked her up from being spayed, there was a little note on the adoption form saying that she is more like 10 years old! I asked the staff why they didn't know this before, and they told me the doctor doesn't see the animals until they get adopted. I wonder what the vet actually does there besides euthanizing?!!!
Tips & Advices
Most city and county shelters offer affordable spay/neuter services. SPCA and Humane Society shelters also are known for their low-cost spay/neuter programs.
Shelters typically offer spay/neuter surgery, vaccinations, microchipping and some essential medical treatment (deworming, mange treatment) to animals being adopted from the shelter. For other veterinary services, you will need to find a vet.
No-kill and low-kill shelters will state it in their online profile and other official materials. They will usually explain what their process/policy is for looking after the animals in their care. These are also known as “limited admission” shelters because they are usually at full capacity most or all of the time. Also, they often work with rescue organizations or county Animal Services authorities to accommodate animals living in inhumane conditions, abandoned or injured animals.
Anyone can bring a lost animal to a county or municipal shelter. However, private shelters affiliated with rescues often will not accept animals, whether lost or surrendered by owners. Shelters with low-kill policies often have a limited admission capability.
Adopting an adult dog from a county or city shelter usually costs $75-$100. Young adult purebreds and puppies often have a higher adoption fee.  The fee to adopt a cat is usually about $50– sometimes with discounts if one new owner adopts two cats. The adoption fee usually covers the cost of spay/neuter surgery and essential vaccinations.

Just a moment...