Best 13 Animal Shelters in Saint Clairsville, OH with Reviews - YP.com

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09/17/2013
By: Charity U.
Belmont County Animal Shelter
My dog got out last night after someone opened our gate and he was let out to go to the restroom. . This morning, I called the pound to see if indeed they had him. I was told that he was hit by a car, in pain and that they were going to euthanize him this afternoon. I immediately left work to go pick up my furry family friend. Upon taking him to the vet it was found that he had a dislocated hip and a hairline fracture in his front paw. There was no reason for him to be euthanized. They (the shelter) also told me that black labs were put down the most because "they were not popular in this area". I find that statement to be so untrue. Labs are the most popular dog breed in the US and are known to be great family pets. I am grateful that they had my dog, but am concerned at their lack of resources and their abundance of animals. They need far more support than what I witnessed at this shelter.
06/30/2017
By: Alice B.
Belmont County Animal Shelter
I adopted Sully after they interviewed me. He is a living doll. Very well behaved and happy to have a forever home with me. He was in Great condition when I got him and we Both couldn't be happier. Anyway I would recommend adopting from here.
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08/23/2015
By: Nikki T.
Belmont County Animal Shelter
My step son has a puppy brutly beat to death with a stick on saturday night or sunday morning if the shelter can help please do we have called our local barnesville police who says they cant do anything.
Tips & Advices
Most city and county shelters offer affordable spay/neuter services. SPCA and Humane Society shelters also are known for their low-cost spay/neuter programs.
Shelters typically offer spay/neuter surgery, vaccinations, microchipping and some essential medical treatment (deworming, mange treatment) to animals being adopted from the shelter. For other veterinary services, you will need to find a vet.
No-kill and low-kill shelters will state it in their online profile and other official materials. They will usually explain what their process/policy is for looking after the animals in their care. These are also known as “limited admission” shelters because they are usually at full capacity most or all of the time. Also, they often work with rescue organizations or county Animal Services authorities to accommodate animals living in inhumane conditions, abandoned or injured animals.
Anyone can bring a lost animal to a county or municipal shelter. However, private shelters affiliated with rescues often will not accept animals, whether lost or surrendered by owners. Shelters with low-kill policies often have a limited admission capability.
Adopting an adult dog from a county or city shelter usually costs $75-$100. Young adult purebreds and puppies often have a higher adoption fee.  The fee to adopt a cat is usually about $50– sometimes with discounts if one new owner adopts two cats. The adoption fee usually covers the cost of spay/neuter surgery and essential vaccinations.

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