Womancare Associates in Monroeville, PA with Reviews - YP.com

Temporary Error.

Please try reloading the page.

06/17/2017
By: Dj R.
McLane, Melissa L, MD
I have torn glut med and glut min tendons. Options: PRP, surgery or live with it. So I decided to try the PRP. What could it hurt?? So in 2016 at the UPMC Lemieux Sports Complex. I scheduled a PRP injection and it was the MOST painful thing I've ever experienced and I've had 2 children, so that is saying a lot. Dr M. Mclane DID NOT numb the area and part of the way through the procedure, I had to basically be "held down" for her to complete the procedure. She kept telling me, " I know this hurts if you need to curse at me go ahead"...hahaha like that would take the pain away!! Then they decided they didn't have enough blood to do a second injection. So they tried to take more blood from my arm and they said because my body had "stressed" so badly from the first injection my Platelets were clotting and basically the second blood draw couldn't be used. I was crying and my entire body was shaking during the procedure and I could barely stand afterwards. They had to take me to my car in a Wheel chair. WHY can't this be done with a numbing agent? She told me the PRP and the anesthetics don't "work" together..I would NEVER go through that again. And needles don't usually bother me. I've had many many trigger point injections. NO Problem. I've had epidurals in my low back to help with pain. NO PROBLEM..! But the PRP injection was HORRIBLE!! Since then I’ve researched it online and other Orthopedic doctors do use numbing agents with PRP injections..So why doesn’t Dr. M. Mclane? How NONE compassionate. I’d NEVER go through that at again, unless the doc uses a numbing agent. And I think Dr Mclane needs to research the fact other doctors do use numbing for this procedure! And she should Care about the comfort of her patients.
Tips & Advices
This depends on the facility. Patients should call to find out if they'll need a referral from their physician prior to making an appointment.
Aside from hyperbaric oxygen treatment, most wound care centers offer:
  • Debridement: The removal of dead skin and tissue surrounding the wound. This can be done surgically, using a whirlpool bath, syringes, enzymes that dissolve the tissue, or wet dressings that dry on the wound and absorb the dead tissue.
  • Dressing: Wrapping the wound in a protective film, gauze, gel, or foam.
  • Compression stockings: Tight-fitted fabric sheaths that encourage blood flow.
  • Artificial skin: A covering that is applied to the wound for several days as it heals.
  • Ultrasound: The use of sound waves to promote healing.
  • Growth factor therapy: The use of materials naturally produced by the body to encourage quick cell growth.
  • Negative pressure therapy: Creating a vacuum around a wound to encourage faster blood flow to the area.
Depending on where the treatment is administered, hyperbaric oxygen treatment  can cost $100- $1,000. After insurance is applied, patients may have a copay of $10 -$50 or a coinsurance fee of 10 percent to 50 percent.
Most wounds should heal within two to six weeks. An individual should seek chronic wound treatment if a wound has not begun to heal after two weeks or is not completely healed after six.
Most health insurance plans cover wound care. Patients should check with the clinic and their health insurance provider before seeking treatment to be sure.

Just a moment...