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09/19/2015
By: Kathryn Y.
SPCA Of Southwest Michigan
I adopted a wonderful loving affectionate little character. Her name is Princess. First off to let everyone know that it was Princess who picked me out of the crowd. Princess came right up to me and gave me that Large smile of hers. She started with wanting her belly rubbed. I bent over to rub her belly then I sat down right next to her and rubbed her belly and petted her. I started out looking for a dog who was potty trained, who would bark loud when strangers approach or an unusual noises and would love to go for car rides. Princess knew exactly what she wanted. She chosen me not the other way around. Princess kept my attention the whole time that I was there. I did not realized that 1 1/2 to 2 hours went by and other people had left. I still was playing with Princess the whole time. People from SPCA had already started to pack up. One of the SPCA ladies came to me and stated I take it that you are going to adopt her and give her a forever home. I looked up at her some what surprised and said I guess I am. That was a week ago Saturday August 22, 2015. Princess turned out to what I wanted and Princess decided that I turned out to be what she wanted. Princess now have a large fenced in yard to run, explore and play in. I take her to Auntie Sheryl's home to play with Rosie who is a Boxer. They get along just great. Princess lets me know when it's time to go back home. Princess enjoys her new family and her new forever home.
Tips & Advices
Most city and county shelters offer affordable spay/neuter services. SPCA and Humane Society shelters also are known for their low-cost spay/neuter programs.
Shelters typically offer spay/neuter surgery, vaccinations, microchipping and some essential medical treatment (deworming, mange treatment) to animals being adopted from the shelter. For other veterinary services, you will need to find a vet.
No-kill and low-kill shelters will state it in their online profile and other official materials. They will usually explain what their process/policy is for looking after the animals in their care. These are also known as “limited admission” shelters because they are usually at full capacity most or all of the time. Also, they often work with rescue organizations or county Animal Services authorities to accommodate animals living in inhumane conditions, abandoned or injured animals.
Anyone can bring a lost animal to a county or municipal shelter. However, private shelters affiliated with rescues often will not accept animals, whether lost or surrendered by owners. Shelters with low-kill policies often have a limited admission capability.
Adopting an adult dog from a county or city shelter usually costs $75-$100. Young adult purebreds and puppies often have a higher adoption fee.  The fee to adopt a cat is usually about $50– sometimes with discounts if one new owner adopts two cats. The adoption fee usually covers the cost of spay/neuter surgery and essential vaccinations.

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