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09/07/2010
By: tritexan
Animal Emergency Clinic NE
Our 19 yr old cat had been fighting liver cancer for quite a while. In his old age, he had become unsteady on his feet. Well the poor guy tried to climb the cat tree in our house (we have 5 others) and fell. Unfortunately in his fall, he ruptured something internally and was bleeding. We took him to this clinic, which is our local emergency clinic, on Labor Day. His condition was dire and we had already decided he didn't have very long to live, so we wanted to avoid him suffering or any heroics. The staff here worked quickly to triage our baby and helped us end his suffering quickly. While it was a very, VERY sad day for us - we had spent nearly 20 wonderful years with this little guy - he (and us) were treated well during this emotional and stressful time.Thank you to the entire team here for treating us quickly and efficiently. The long waits at an after-hours emergency vet clinic are sometimes horrible. We know the doctors do their best, but I can't express enough how much pet parents appreciate it when the clinic has the people and processes in place to support quick response to even less-than-life-threatening injuries.
11/14/2012
By: lmarie66
Lone Star Veterinary Hospital
I had to take my male cat to another Vet; because my current Vet just wouldn't take the time to diagnose properly. I called Dr. Bryant's office and spoke with his ;ovely wife Amanda! I was hooked and made an appointment immediately and le...ft work to bring my Frizbee to Lonestar! He has blood in his urine and he hates going to the Vet! Dr Bryant rolled around on the floor and made my Frizbee feel like he was a part of the family!!! Amanda, Vickie, Tammie and Xavier made me feel like they've known me for years! Frizbee didn't want to leave!!! He has always screamed and even foamed at the mouth when I took him to my "now previous" Vet. Now after 7 years my sweet cat is happy and will be healthy again! Dr. Bryant first initial visit / consulltation is FREE and he will advise your accordingly and most importantly HONESTLY. God bless you my new Lonestar family!!!!
04/04/2015
By: Donna B.
Lone Star Veterinary Hospital
Kind and compassionate - Dr Bryant cares about his patients. The plans he has to take care of your pets without having to worry about a huge bill is very helpful!
Tips & Advices
Most 24-hour clinics do not allow owners to stay with their pets overnight. However, many do have specific visiting hours or will let owners see their pets at any point during the day. In addition, owners can call most clinics at any time for an update on their pet's well being.
  • Important phone numbers, especially those of the the veterinary clinic, the animal hospital or emergency clinic, and the poison control center
  • A book detailing pet first-aid steps
  • Copy of medical records
  • Nylon leash
  • Muzzle (only use if pet is not vomiting and has no difficulty breathing)
  • Absorbent gauze
  • Nonlatex disposable gloves
  • Scissors
  • Tweezers
  • Nail clippers
  • Digital thermometer
  • Sterile saline solution
  • Hydrogen peroxide (to induce vomiting only at the recommendation of a veterinarian
  • Milk of magnesia (to absorb poison only at the recommendation of a veterinarian)
Find a 24-hour animal hospital that provides emergency services within your area. Keep the facility's contact information in a place that's easy to locate, such as the refrigerator, address book, or smartphone. Most veterinary clinics operate on standard business hours and are not equipped to handle emergencies.
Veterinary clinics operate on a smaller scale than animal hospitals. The latter are more likely open 24 hours and provide emergency services. The former generally operate on typical office hours and only perform wellness exams and minor surgeries. Veterinary clinics also do not generally perform laboratory tests on site.
The specifics vary depending on the type of visit. For a wellness exam, bring:
  • Medical records
  • The type or brand of food the pet eats
  • Medication (including flea, tick, and heartworm medication).
If the animal needs medical treatment, the following may be helpful depending on the situation:
  • Fresh stool sample
  • Vomit sample
  • Video of the pet engaging in abnormal behavior
  • Substance the pet may have ingested

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