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05/05/2013
By: catmommie
Last Hope Inc
I have adopted 3 wonderful cats over the last 15 years from Last Hope (2 more from other sources). I had to agree not to declaw the cat and or ever let it outside. Which I did for many years. Not declawing is easy I just trim their claws. Going outside was not so easy. One of my cats (my favorite) was a little stinker when it came to "door darting". We became masters at outsmarting his attempts. He was a rescued stray and he was very comfortable being outside. In time I made a decision to try giving my cats some yard time thinking this would help with their desire to be outside. We have a large yard and my kitties are only allowed to be outside when I am outside. Never out when I am not home and never out overnight. Even my Vet calls that supervised outdoor visits. It works very well for all of us except my little darter. Unfortunately that trait cost him his life. He darted one night when the back door was opened, it was pouring rain and we couldn't get him back in. I was very worried because we had recently had coyotes in the area. I found my dear kitty the next day in the wooded area behind our yard having been killed by coyotes. I was devastated and heartbroken.I related this sad story to the woman from Last Hope the next time I was at PetSmart in Eagan. She was angry with me and told me that she could never let me adopt another cat from her because I let my cats outside. I tried explaining to her that he was such a scaredy cat when I got him that he spent his first year with us under the bed. As trust began to build he became a very loving and affectionate cat who slept on my bed every night. I adored him and he adored me. He had 6 great years with us and a very nice life. Such a tragedy for it to end the way it did. I did not need to be dressed down as a bad pet owner. My neighbors call me the cat whisperer because I am so loving and attuned to my cats' individual personalities.A little sensitivity would go a long way towards adoptive pet owners. I have found Last Hope to be a very professional and thorough animal rescue shelter. I have nothing bad to say about the company and I already recommend them to others, I have friends and family members who have adopted from Last Hope.
Tips & Advices
Most city and county shelters offer affordable spay/neuter services. SPCA and Humane Society shelters also are known for their low-cost spay/neuter programs.
Shelters typically offer spay/neuter surgery, vaccinations, microchipping and some essential medical treatment (deworming, mange treatment) to animals being adopted from the shelter. For other veterinary services, you will need to find a vet.
No-kill and low-kill shelters will state it in their online profile and other official materials. They will usually explain what their process/policy is for looking after the animals in their care. These are also known as “limited admission” shelters because they are usually at full capacity most or all of the time. Also, they often work with rescue organizations or county Animal Services authorities to accommodate animals living in inhumane conditions, abandoned or injured animals.
Anyone can bring a lost animal to a county or municipal shelter. However, private shelters affiliated with rescues often will not accept animals, whether lost or surrendered by owners. Shelters with low-kill policies often have a limited admission capability.
Adopting an adult dog from a county or city shelter usually costs $75-$100. Young adult purebreds and puppies often have a higher adoption fee.  The fee to adopt a cat is usually about $50– sometimes with discounts if one new owner adopts two cats. The adoption fee usually covers the cost of spay/neuter surgery and essential vaccinations.

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