• 1.Elizabethton Carter County Animal Shelter

    253 Sycamore Shoals Dr

    Elizabethton,TN

    2.07 mi

    (2)

    I'm a volunteer at the shelter and I can vouch for the hard work and determination that has been put in to make many positive changes to this shelter. The Mayor and his assistant, Susan, have really t

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05/19/2016
By: cdsturgill45
Elizabethton Carter County Animal Shelter
You could be there for hours and no one offers to up you. The women at the front desk is very rude to potential adopters and the Director Stacy is very rude and hateful. The facith is not clean and it stinks. The i,mate's can tell you more about all the dogs than the Director. There are also 2 girls named Wendy that are very ,ice and can answere your questions. If their there I don't always visit anymore. I stopped going because of the way I was talked to by the Director. I have not been back and don't intend to because of the way I was treated by her and her best friend that works at the front window. Some drastic changes need to be made and this as been reported to the Mayor. With no response.
10/18/2016
By: R L.
Elizabethton Carter County Animal Shelter
I'm a volunteer at the shelter and I can vouch for the hard work and determination that has been put in to make many positive changes to this shelter. The Mayor and his assistant, Susan, have really turned the shelter around. They have even more projects for the near future to give the animals a more comfortable place to stay while they wait for their furever homes. If you've had bad experiences in the past there, please give this shelter and the new personnel and director a chance. The animals and current workers shouldn't pay for the mistakes of others who are no longer there.
Tips & Advices
Most city and county shelters offer affordable spay/neuter services. SPCA and Humane Society shelters also are known for their low-cost spay/neuter programs.
Shelters typically offer spay/neuter surgery, vaccinations, microchipping and some essential medical treatment (deworming, mange treatment) to animals being adopted from the shelter. For other veterinary services, you will need to find a vet.
No-kill and low-kill shelters will state it in their online profile and other official materials. They will usually explain what their process/policy is for looking after the animals in their care. These are also known as “limited admission” shelters because they are usually at full capacity most or all of the time. Also, they often work with rescue organizations or county Animal Services authorities to accommodate animals living in inhumane conditions, abandoned or injured animals.
Anyone can bring a lost animal to a county or municipal shelter. However, private shelters affiliated with rescues often will not accept animals, whether lost or surrendered by owners. Shelters with low-kill policies often have a limited admission capability.
Adopting an adult dog from a county or city shelter usually costs $75-$100. Young adult purebreds and puppies often have a higher adoption fee.  The fee to adopt a cat is usually about $50– sometimes with discounts if one new owner adopts two cats. The adoption fee usually covers the cost of spay/neuter surgery and essential vaccinations.

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